Yes… but is it art?

I was recently having a heated debate with my very good friend, Dr Phyllis Stein.  We were arguing about the validity of some ‘sculptural installations’ that were springing up in an East Devon wood.  Phyllis asserted that in order to create art, you needed to set out to create art.  And, even if the end result was a pile of pretentious junk, Phyllis was adamant that art was art and therefore worth what someone was prepared to pay for it.  Indeed, the higher the price tag, the better the art.

Anyway, this is what led to the argument…

loggers5

…and in my opinion, the photo definitely depicts an example of modern art; it’s easy on the eye and since it is a recent installation, it is… well… modern… isn’t it (?).  And, having made several visits to Tate Modern, I am well qualified to express an opinion on the subject of what constitutes art.  Indeed, Tate Modern has over the years offered a unique service, located, as it is, in exactly the right place to provide a therapeutic break during a demanding pub-crawl.  I did (only once) make the mistake of visiting this ‘temple of modern art’ prior to tucking away a few pints and the experience was, to say the least, unsettling.  Do it in the correct order though and a visit to Tate Modern after first visiting several inns, followed by a philosophical debate at a few more watering holes is a thoroughly enjoyable way to waste a day in London.

A proper painter (you can tell what his paintings are supposed to be) recently attempted to explain modern art to me, maintaining that understanding the back-story leading to a particular installation, daub, unmade bed, pickled shark, added immensely to one’s appreciation of the form, which brings me back to Phyllis’ point; to qualify as art, must the perpetrator actually set out to produce art, or, can a fortuitous accident qualify?   I only pose this question because when asked, the artless individual responsible for the woodland sculptures shown in the photograph said that he was constructing log stores off of the ground to assist seasoning prior to burning.  Furthermore, when it was mooted that what he had actually produced was worthy of the Turner Prize, he retorted with “stop taking the pxxx!”.  Anyway, someone did (innocently by the way; they thought it was firewood!) remove part of an ‘installation’.  They were however quickly advised of their mistake and asked to put it back.

So, although I already know the answer, I’ll throw the question open.  Yes, the random log stores are indeed things of beauty and they demonstrate the dedication and hard work that is going into restoring an area of woodland, BUT…

…is it art?

One thought on “Yes… but is it art?

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